Defra - Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs.

Science Search

Science and Research Projects

Return to Science Search homepage   Return to Project List

Investigation of potential treatments for eradication of Small hive beetle - PH0526

Description
Small hive beetle (SHB) is an invasive species originating from Africa which has proved to be a serious pest of honey bee hives in the USA and Australia. In September 2014 SHB was detected in South West Italy. EU regulatory measures were implemented including destruction of all the honey bee colonies in the apiaries where SHB was found and treatment of the surrounding soil. However in September 2015 further cases of SHB were detected in Italy. Packaged bees and queens are traded more freely in the EU than from outside where there are currently only 3 countries that meet the UK import requirements. Therefore the arrival of SHB in the EU has increased the threat of SHB arriving in the UK.

Rapid detection and destruction of any SHB outbreaks in the UK is key for successful eradication of this pest. During the SHB lifecycle mature larvae migrate out of the hive and pupate in the soil below. However, we do not currently have approved UK chemical products for use in this application. We therefore need to identify candidate chemicals to test on SHB larvae and gather data to support our application for an emergency derogation in the event of an incursion.
Objective
1.Identify potential product(s) to test in laboratory efficacy tests.
2.Carry out laboratory efficacy tests to treat SHB larvae with the selected product and assess the levels of mortality caused.
3.Perform the efficacy tests under different conditions to determine the impact of the product under possible outbreak conditions.
4.Based on the results from the laboratory studies make recommendations about whether approval for emergency use should be requested.
Time-Scale and Cost
From: 2016

To: 2016

Cost: £32,411
Contractor / Funded Organisations
F E R A (FERA)
Keywords
Bee Pests              
Fields of Study
Plant Health